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The Tentacle agent can be installed fully automatically from the command line. This is very useful if you're deploying to a large number of servers, or you'll be provisioning servers automatically.

On this page:

Tentacle installers

Tentacle comes in an MSI that can be deployed via group policy or other means. 

Download the Tentacle MSI

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To install the MSI silently:

By default, the Tentacle files are installed under %programfiles(x86)%. To change the installation directory, you can specify:

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Whilst you can set a customer INSTALLLOCATION for the Tentacle, please be aware that upgrades initiated by Octopus Server will currently install the upgraded Tentacle back into the default location. This may have an impact if you are using the Service Watchdog.

Configuration

The MSI installer simply extracts files and adds some shortcuts and event log sources. The actual configuration of Tentacle is done later, and this can automated too. 

To configure the Tentacle in listening or polling mode, it's easiest to run the installation wizard once, and at the end, use the Show Script option in the setup wizard. This will show you the command-line equivalent to configure a Tentacle. 

Advanced configuration options

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When configuring your tentacle you can configure advanced options, like proxies, machine policies and tenants, which can also be automated. Use the setup wizard to configure the Tentacle, and click the Show Script link which will show you the command-line equivalent to configure the Tentacle.

Example: Listening Tentacle

The following example configures a listening Tentacle, and registers it with an Octopus Deploy server:

Using Tentacle.exe to create Listening Tentacle instance

You can also register a Tentacle with the Octopus Server after it has been installed by using Octopus.Client (i.e. register-with could be omitted above and the following could be used after the instance has started.  See below for how to obtain the tentacle's thumbprint):

Using Octopus.Client to register a Tentacle in an Octopus Server
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Want to register your Tentacles another way? Take a look at the examples in our sample repository using the Octopus API to register Tentacles, and do a whole lot more!

 

Example: Polling Tentacle

The following example configures a polling Tentacle, and registers it with an Octopus Deploy server: 

Polling Tentacle
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If you are running this from a Powershell remote session, make sure to add `--console` at the end of each command to force Tentacle.exe not to run as a service

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Want to register your Tentacles another way? Take a look at the examples in our sample repository using the Octopus API to register Tentacles, and do a whole lot more!

Obtaining the Tentacle Thumbprint

If you don't know the thumbprint for the above PowerShell scripts, it can be obtained with the following command line option:

Obtaining Thumbprint

 

Desired State Configuration

Tentacles can also be installed via Desired State Configuration (DSC). Using the module from the OctopusDSC GitHub repository, you can add, remove, start and stop Tentacles in either polling or listening mode.

The following PowerShell script will install a Tentacle listening on port 10933 against the Octopus server at https://YOUR_OCTOPUS, add it to the Development environment and assign the web-server and app-server roles: 

DSC Configuration

DSC can be applied in various ways, such as Group Policy, a DSC Pull Server, Azure Automation, or even via configuration management tools such as Chef or Puppet. A good resource to learn more about DSC is the Microsoft Virtual Academy training course.

 

 

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